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Corruption and Network in Education: Evidence from the Household Survey Data in Bangladesh

Author

Listed:
  • Chongwoo Choe
  • Ratbek Dzhumashev
  • Asadul Islam
  • Zakir H. Khan

Abstract

We examine the causes and consequences of corruption in the provision of education service in Bangladesh. Our empirical analysis is based on the 2007 household survey data collected by Transparency International Bangladesh (TIB), which measure actual corruption. Our main findings are (i) both the incidence of corruption and the amount of bribe increase in the level of red tape, (ii) poorer households, households with less educated household head, and households with girls studying in school are more likely to be victims of corruption, (iii) households with higher social status are more likely to rely on informal network to bypass the red tape or pay less amount of bribe and, as a result, (iv) corruption in the education sector is likely to be regressive.

Suggested Citation

  • Chongwoo Choe & Ratbek Dzhumashev & Asadul Islam & Zakir H. Khan, 2011. "Corruption and Network in Education: Evidence from the Household Survey Data in Bangladesh," Monash Economics Working Papers 08-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2011-08
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    File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2011/0811corruptioneduchoedzhumasheislamkhan.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; corruption; bribery; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • K4 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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