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What Determines Corruption? International Evidence From Microdata

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  • NACI MOCAN

Abstract

This paper uses a microlevel data set from 49 countries to create a direct measure of corruption, which portrays the extent of bribery as revealed by individuals who live in those countries. In addition, it investigates the determinants of being asked for a bribe at the individual level. The results show that both personal and country characteristics determine the risk of exposure to bribery. Examples are gender, income, education, marital status, the city size, the country’s unemployment rate, average education, and the strength of the institutions in the country. (JEL K4, D73 P16)

Suggested Citation

  • Naci Mocan, 2008. "What Determines Corruption? International Evidence From Microdata," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(4), pages 493-510, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:46:y:2008:i:4:p:493-510
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-7295.2007.00107.x
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • K4 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior

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