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An individual level analysis of the disposition effect : empirical and experimental evidence

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  • Weber, Martin
  • Welfens, Frank

Abstract

We test empirically and experimentally for individual differences, stability, and learning in individual level disposition effects. While we observe the disposition effect on aggregate, the extent to which a single decision maker is affected varies considerably across investors. We find overwhelming evidence for stability of individual disposition effects both within and across tasks, as well as across time. Learning, nevertheless, attenuates the magnitude of the effect strongly within tasks and over time. In accordance with prior research, we document that frequent traders sell their winners less and their losers more often, resulting in lower disposition effects. We also document evidence that the magnitude of the bias depends on the length of the holding period.

Suggested Citation

  • Weber, Martin & Welfens, Frank, 2007. "An individual level analysis of the disposition effect : empirical and experimental evidence," Papers 07-45, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
  • Handle: RePEc:mnh:spaper:2523
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    File URL: https://ub-madoc.bib.uni-mannheim.de/2523/1/dp07_45.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rau, Holger A., 2015. "The disposition effect in team investment decisions: Experimental evidence," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 256, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    2. Carlos Cueva Herrero & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene & Giovanni Ponti & Josefa Tomás Lucas, 2017. "Boys will (still) be boys: Gender differences in trading activity are not due to differences in confidence," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-06, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    3. Weber, Martin & Welfens, Frank, 2007. "How do Markets React to Fundamental Shocks? An Experimental Analysis on Underreaction and Momentum," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 07-42, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    4. Glaser, Markus & Weber, Martin, 2009. "Which past returns affect trading volume?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 1-31, February.
    5. Tobias Kranz & Florian Teschner & Christof Weinhardt, 2015. "Beware of Performance Indicators," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 57(6), pages 349-361, December.
    6. Carlos Cueva Herrero & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene & Giovanni Ponti & Josefa Tomás Lucas, 2016. "The disposition effect: who and when?," Working Papers. Serie AD 2016-01, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    7. Rau, Holger A., 2015. "The disposition effect in team investment decisions: Experimental evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 272-282.
    8. Glaser, Markus & Weber, Martin, 2007. "Why inexperienced investors do not learn: They do not know their past portfolio performance," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 203-216, December.
    9. Tõnn Talpsepp, 2010. "Does Gender and Age Affect Investor Performance and the Disposition Effect?," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 2(1).
    10. Hermann, Daniel & Mußhoff, Oliver & Rau, Holger A., 2017. "The disposition effect when deciding on behalf of others," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 332, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    11. Ormos, Mihály & Joó, István, 2011. "Diszpozíciós hatás a magyar tőkepiacon
      [Disposition effect in the Hungarian capital market]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 743-758.
    12. Ormos, Mihály & Joó, István, 2014. "Are Hungarian investors reluctant to realize their losses?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 52-58.
    13. Lucks, Konstantin, 2016. "The Impact of Self-Control on Investment Decisions," MPRA Paper 73099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Rau, Holger A., 2014. "The disposition effect and loss aversion: Do gender differences matter?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 33-36.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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