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Information and Communication Technologies in a Multi-Sector Endogenous Growth Model

  • Evangelia Vourvachaki

    (London School of Economics)

This paper investigates the growth impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in an economy consisting of three sectors, ICT-producing, ICT-using and non-ICTusing. The ICT progress causes falling prices of the consumption and intermediates produced by the ICT-using sector, providing incentives for investment in the sectors using them. Therefore, the non-ICT-using sector benefits indirectly from ICT, while households' utility increases. The magnitude of the growth transmission mechanism relies on the ICT-using sector production shares. Aggregate economy is on a constant growth path, where growth rates differ across sectors. The model predictions are broadly consistent with the U.S. growth experience.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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File URL: http://repec.org/mmfc05/paper10.pdf
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Paper provided by Money Macro and Finance Research Group in its series Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2005 with number 10.

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Date of creation: 03 Sep 2005
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Handle: RePEc:mmf:mmfc05:10
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.essex.ac.uk/afm/mmf/index.html

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