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Mapping prices into productivity in multisector growth models

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  • Ngai, Liwa Rachel
  • Samaniego, Roberto

Abstract

Two issues related to mapping a multi-sector model into a reduced-form value-added model are often neglected: the composition of intermediate goods, and the distinction between the productivity indices for value added and for gross output. We illustrate their significance for growth accounting using the well known model of Greenwood, Hercowitz and Krusell (1997), who find that about 60% of economic growth can be attributed to investment-specific technical change (ISTC). When we recalibrate their model to account for the composition of intermediates, we find that ISTC accounts for an even greater share of post-war US growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Ngai, Liwa Rachel & Samaniego, Roberto, 2009. "Mapping prices into productivity in multisector growth models," CEPR Discussion Papers 7318, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7318
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Foerster & Andreas Hornstein & Pierre-Daniel G. Sarte & Mark W. Watson, 2019. "Aggregate Implications of Changing Sectoral Trends," Working Paper 19-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    2. Nikolay Chernyshev, 2018. "From Productivity Shifts to Economic Growth: Intersectoral Linkage as an Amplifying Factor," CDMA Working Paper Series 201801, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    3. Mehdi Senouci, 2012. "Technical change in a neoclassical two-sector model of optimal growth," Working Papers halshs-00589627, HAL.
    4. Alessio Moro, 2015. "Structural Change, Growth, and Volatility," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 259-294, July.
    5. Georges Daw, 2022. "Determinants of Wealth Disparities in the EU: A Multi-scale Development Accounting Investigation," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 64(2), pages 211-254, June.
    6. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2020. "Relative Prices and Sectoral Productivity," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 1400-1443.
    7. Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2013. "Modernization of agriculture and long-term growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 367-382.
    8. Ilyina, Anna & Samaniego, Roberto, 2012. "Structural change and financing constraints," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 166-179.
    9. Jan Grobovsek, 2013. "Development Accounting with Intermediate Goods," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 223, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    10. Aoki, Shuhei, 2011. "A Model of Technology Transfer in Japan's Rapid Economic Growth Period," MPRA Paper 29235, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Cao, Shutao, 2017. "Accounting for productivity growth in a small open economy: Sector-specific technological change and relative prices of trade," Working Paper Series 6203, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    12. Berlingieri, Giuseppe, 2013. "Outsourcing and the rise in services," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51532, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. L. Ngai & Roberto Samaniego, 2009. "Mapping prices into productivity in multisector growth models," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 183-204, September.
    14. Sean Holly & Ivan Petrella, 2012. "Factor Demand Linkages, Technology Shocks, and the Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(4), pages 948-963, November.
    15. Grobovšek Jan, 2018. "Development accounting with intermediate goods," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 18(1), pages 1-27, January.
    16. Alessio Moro & Omar Rachedi, 2022. "The Changing Structure Of Government Consumption Spending," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 63(3), pages 1293-1323, August.
    17. Claudio Baccianti & Andreas Löschel, 2014. "The Role of Product and Process Innovation in CGE Models of Environmental Policy. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 68," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 47501, June.
    18. Evangelia Vourvachaki, 2005. "Information and Communication Technologies in a Multi-Sector Endogenous Growth Model," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2005 10, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    19. Roberto Samaniego & Juliana Sun, 2016. "Productivity Growth and Structural Transformation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 21, pages 266-285, July.
    20. Moro, Alessio & Rachedi, Omar, 2018. "The Changing Structure of Government Spending," MPRA Paper 86577, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Claudio Baccianti & Andreas Löschel, 2015. "Investment-specific versus Process Innovation in a CGE Model of Environmental Policy. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 85," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57893, June.
    22. Jan, Grobovsek, 2013. "Development Accounting Within Intermediate Goods," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-42, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    23. Ma, Xiaohan & Samaniego, Roberto, 2022. "Business cycle dynamics when neutral and investment-specific technology shocks are imperfectly observable," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    growth accounting; Intermediate goods; investment-specific technical change; multisector growth models; value added;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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