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Aggregate Fluctuations and the Industry Structure of the US Economy

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  • Julieta Caunedo

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

Abstract

specifiÂ…c technological change.

Suggested Citation

  • Julieta Caunedo, 2014. "Aggregate Fluctuations and the Industry Structure of the US Economy," 2014 Meeting Papers 1194, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:1194
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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_1194.pdf
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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