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On the Long run Determinants of Industry TFP Growth Rates

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  • Ngai, Liwa Rachel
  • Samaniego, Roberto

Abstract

We develop a multi-sector general equilibrium model in which productivity growth is driven by the generation of knowledge. In the model, firms allocate resources towards the production of goods and the production of new knowledge, in response to industry-specific factors of demand and technology. In equilibrium, we find that long run differences in research intensity and productivity growth are primarily driven by the parameters of the production function for knowledge -- particularly the extent to which the production of new knowledge benefits from prior knowledge, which we term receptivity. Conditional on receptivity, whether the production of knowledge relies on prior knowledge that is internally generated by the firm or whether it instead "spills over" from its competitors does not appear to be quantitatively important. The results are consistent with a number of empirical findings on the relationship between research intensity and rates of technical change.

Suggested Citation

  • Ngai, Liwa Rachel & Samaniego, Roberto, 2007. "On the Long run Determinants of Industry TFP Growth Rates," CEPR Discussion Papers 6408, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6408
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto M. Samaniego, 2008. "Entry, Exit and Investment-Specific Technical Change, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 09-020, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 08 Dec 2008.
    2. Ngai, L. Rachel & Samaniego, Roberto M., 2008. "Research and Productivity Growth Across Industries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4410, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multi-sector growth; R&D Intensity; Technological Opportunity; Total Factor Productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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