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Restructuring and Recovery of the Irish Financial Sector: An Economic Case History V2

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  • Gregory Connor

    () (Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, Maynooth University.)

  • Thomas Flavin

    (Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, Maynooth University.)

  • Brian O'Kelly

    (Dublin City University)

Abstract

During the years 2003 to 2008, the Irish domestic financial sector experienced a very fast and poorly controlled expansion, followed by a dramatic collapse. The causes of the Irish credit bubble and bust have been exhaustively examined; see for example Connor et al. (2012), Honohan (2010), Nyberg (2011), Regling and Watson (2010) and additional references therein. Over the next six years, from late 2008 to 2014, the Irish financial sector went through a painful restructuring and slow, modestly successful, recovery. This paper provides an economic analysis of the Irish financial sector’s restructuring and recovery period. The paper considers both domestic and foreign banks operating in Ireland, household and corporate debt, property and other asset markets, and business investment. We analyse what the Irish experience tells us about the economic theory of post-crisis financial sector restructuring and recovery strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Connor & Thomas Flavin & Brian O'Kelly, 2015. "Restructuring and Recovery of the Irish Financial Sector: An Economic Case History V2," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n259-15.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  • Handle: RePEc:may:mayecw:n259-15.pdf
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    File URL: http://repec.maynoothuniversity.ie/mayecw-files/N259-15.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    2. Miguel Almunia & Agustín Bénétrix & Barry Eichengreen & Kevin H. O'Rourke & Gisela Rua, 2010. "From Great Depression to Great Credit Crisis: similarities, differences and lessons," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 219-265, April.
    3. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1994. "The Capital Inflows Problem: Concepts And Issues," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(3), pages 54-66, July.
    4. Honohan, Patrick & Donovan, Donal & Gorecki, Paul & Mottiar, Rafique, 2010. "The Irish Banking Crisis: Regulatory and Financial Stability Policy," MPRA Paper 24896, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Preface," MPRA Paper 17451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Chapter 1," MPRA Paper 17452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Connor, Gregory & Flavin, Thomas & O’Kelly, Brian, 2012. "The U.S. and Irish credit crises: Their distinctive differences and common features," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 60-79.
    8. Gregory Connor & Brian O’Kelly, 2012. "Sliding Doors Cost Measurement: The Net Economic Cost of Lax Regulation of the Irish Banking Sector," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(10), pages 1256-1276, October.
    9. Karl Whelan, 2012. "ELA, Promissory Notes and All That:The Fiscal Costs of Anglo Irish Bank," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(4), pages 653-673.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. New Working Paper on the Restructuring and Recovery of the Irish Financial Sector
      by Gregory Connor in The Irish Economy on 2015-04-02 19:13:05

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nevin, Ciarán, 2018. "Irish retail bank profitability 2003-20018," Financial Stability Notes 10-18, Central Bank of Ireland.
    2. Honohan, Patrick, 2016. "Debt and austerity: Post-crisis lessons from Ireland," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 149-157.

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