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Peer Effects in the Demand for Housing Quality

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Abstract

Using detailed data on friendship networks within neighborhoods, we investigate the importance of social interactions in one's own residential neighborhood in the demand for housing quality. We find evidence consistent with the presence of peer effects, especially for households living in urban areas. Our findings are in line with the prediction of a model where conformity preferences are the key element underlying economic outcomes that involve interactions with peers. Key Words: Social Networks; Linear-In-Means Model; Spatial Autoregression Model; Social Norms JEL No. A14, C21, D85, R21, Z13

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  • Eleonora Patacchini & Giuseppe Venanzoni, 2013. "Peer Effects in the Demand for Housing Quality," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 158, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  • Handle: RePEc:max:cprwps:158
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    Cited by:

    1. Lenzi, Camilla, 2016. "Co-invention networks and inventive productivity in US citiesAuthor-Name: Breschi, Stefano," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 66-75.
    2. Mota, Nuno & Patacchini, Eleonora & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2016. "Neighborhood Effects, Peer Classification, and the Decision of Women to Work," IZA Discussion Papers 9985, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Bruno Wichmann & Minjie Chen & Wiktor Adamowicz, 2016. "Social Networks and Choice Set Formation in Discrete Choice Models," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-26, October.
    4. Gibbons, Steve & Overman, Henry G. & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2015. "Spatial Methods," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Hans R.A. Koster & Jan Rouwendal, 2015. "Historic Amenities and Housing Externalities: Evidence from The Netherlands," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-023/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    6. Aronsson, Thomas & Mannberg, Andrea, 2015. "Relative consumption of housing: Marginal saving subsidies and income taxes as a second-best policy?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 439-450.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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