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Conformism and Structural Change

Author

Listed:
  • Takeo Hori

    () (Aoyamagakuin University)

  • Masako Ikefuji

    () (University of Southern Denmark)

  • Kazuo Mino

    () (Kyoto University)

Abstract

We study structural change in a simple, two-sector endogenous growth model and show that the presence of commodity-specific consumption externalities can be a source of structural change. When the degrees of consumption externalities are different between different goods, the two sectors grow at different rates, whereas the aggregate economy exhibits balanced growth in the sense that capital stock and expenditure grow at the same constant rate. Under the more restrictive condition such that the degrees of consumption externalities are the same, structural change does not occur. We also show that the dependence of the benchmark consumption levels on the past consumption is crucial for the divergent patterns of structural change across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Takeo Hori & Masako Ikefuji & Kazuo Mino, 2012. "Conformism and Structural Change," KIER Working Papers 825, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:825
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    File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP825.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Piyabha Kongsamut & Sergio Rebelo & Danyang Xie, 2001. "Beyond Balanced Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(4), pages 869-882.
    2. Fredrik Carlsson & Olof Johansson-Stenman & Peter Martinsson, 2007. "Do You Enjoy Having More than Others? Survey Evidence of Positional Goods," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(296), pages 586-598, November.
    3. Francisco J. Buera & Joseph P. Kaboski, 2009. "Can Traditional Theories of Structural Change Fit The Data?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 469-477, 04-05.
    4. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2007. "Structural Change in a Multisector Model of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 429-443, March.
    5. Doi, Junko & Mino, Kazuo, 2008. "A variety-expansion model of growth with external habit formation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 3055-3083, October.
    6. Dolores Guilló, María & Papageorgiou, Chris & Perez-Sebastian, Fidel, 2011. "A unified theory of structural change," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 1393-1404, September.
    7. Alpizar, Francisco & Carlsson, Fredrik & Johansson-Stenman, Olof, 2005. "How much do we care about absolute versus relative income and consumption?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 405-421, March.
    8. Foellmi, Reto & Zweimüller, Josef, 2008. "Structural change, Engel's consumption cycles and Kaldor's facts of economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1317-1328, October.
    9. Morten Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2006. "Deep Habits," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 195-218.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yunfang Hu & Kazuo Mino, 2014. "Capital Accumulation and Structural Change in a Small Open Economy," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 634-656, December.
    2. Herrendorf, Berthold & Valentinyi, Akos, 2015. "Endogenous Sector-Biased Technological Change and Industrial Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 10869, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural change; Consumption externalities; Two-sector growth model; Kaldor facts;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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