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Conspicuous consumption and satisfaction

  • Winkelmann, Rainer

Traditional tools of welfare economics identify the envy-related welfare loss from conspicuous consumption only under very strong assumptions. Measured income and life satisfaction offers an alternative for estimating such consumption externalities. The approach is developed in the context of luxury car consumption (Ferraris and Porsches) in Switzerland. Results from household panel data and fixed effects panel regressions suggest that the prevalence of luxury cars in the municipality of residence has a negative impact on own income satisfaction.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

Volume (Year): 33 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 183-191

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Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:183-191
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

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