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Structural Transformation in Developed and Developing Countries

  • Bah, El-hadj M.

Dierences in key features of the development process across rich and poor countries can provide clues to the sources of the large variation of cross- country income. Kuznets included structural transformation as one of six stylized facts of economic development, nding that developed countries all followed the same process. In this paper, I compare structural transformation processes in developed and developing countries. I nd that developing countries follow distinct structural transformation paths that deviate from that followed by developed countries. A puzzling nding is the presence of substantial sectoral changes during times of economic stagnation or decline.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 10655.

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Date of creation: Nov 2007
Date of revision: 19 Sep 2008
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10655
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  1. Murphy, Kevin M. & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Scholarly Articles 3606235, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Syrquin, Moshe, 1986. "Growth and Structural Change in Latin America since 1960: A Comparative Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(3), pages 433-54, April.
  3. Restuccia, Diego & Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2008. "Agriculture and aggregate productivity: A quantitative cross-country analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 234-250, March.
  4. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2007. "The Role of the Structural Transformation in Aggregate Productivity," Working Papers tecipa-300, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  5. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2007. "Structural Change in a Multisector Model of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 429-443, March.
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  7. Piyabha Kongsamut & Sergio Rebelo & Danyang Xie, 1997. "Beyond Balanced Growth," NBER Working Papers 6159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Parente, Stephen L & Prescott, Edward C, 1994. "Barriers to Technology Adoption and Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 298-321, April.
  9. Bah, El-hadj M., 2007. "A Three-Sector Model of Structural Transformation and Economic Development," MPRA Paper 10654, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Sep 2008.
  10. Richard Rogerson, 2008. "Structural Transformation and the Deterioration of European Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(2), pages 235-259, 04.
  11. Gollin, Douglas & Parente, Stephen L. & Rogerson, Richard, 2007. "The food problem and the evolution of international income levels," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 1230-1255, May.
  12. John Laitner, 2000. "Structural Change and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 545-561.
  13. Echevarria, Cristina, 1997. "Changes in Sectoral Composition Associated with Economic Growth," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(2), pages 431-52, May.
  14. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2006. "The Structural Transformation and Aggregate Productivity in Portugal," Working Papers tecipa-261, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  15. Chenery, Hollis B, 1975. "The Structuralist Approach to Development Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(2), pages 310-16, May.
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