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Carbon sensitive productivity, climate and institutions

Listed author(s):
  • Surender Kumar

    (University of Delhi, India)

  • Shunsuke Managi

    (Tohoku University)

Climate and institutions might be crucial in lowering the vagaries of climate change impacts in terms of productivity. This study measures the relationships of productivity measures adjusted for the regulation of carbon emission and institutions together with climate change throughout the world. This paper finds there is higher potential for reduction of CO2 emissions in developing countries at lower cost. However, the cost to reduce emissions lowers their growth potential in terms of lost productivity growth. Better institutions help to lower the negative impacts of climate change by improving the process of technological adoption in developing countries. Climate change reduces the productivity growth in developing countries by lowering the process of technological adoption, and better institutions result in higher productivity.

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File URL: http://www.souken.kochi-tech.ac.jp/seido/wp/SDES-2014-15.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management in its series Working Papers with number SDES-2014-15.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2014
Date of revision: Nov 2014
Publication status: Published in SDE Series, November 2014, pages 1-39
Handle: RePEc:kch:wpaper:sdes-2014-15
Contact details of provider: Phone: 81-887572764
Fax: 81-887572124
Web page: http://www.souken.kochi-tech.ac.jp/seido/index.html

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