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Does Learning Beget Learning Throughout Adulthood? Evidence from Employees' Training Participation

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  • Kramer, Anica

    () (RWI)

  • Tamm, Marcus

    () (RWI)

Abstract

Individuals with more years of education generally acquire more training later on in life. Such a relationship may be due to skills learned in early periods increasing returns to educational investments in later periods. This paper addresses the question whether the complementarity between education and training is causal. The identification is based on exogenous variation in years of education due to a reform of the schooling system and the buildup of universities. Results confirm that education has a significant impact on training participation during working life.

Suggested Citation

  • Kramer, Anica & Tamm, Marcus, 2016. "Does Learning Beget Learning Throughout Adulthood? Evidence from Employees' Training Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 9959, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9959
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    training; lifelong learning; returns to schooling;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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