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Anonymous Job Applications of Fresh Ph.D. Economists

Author

Listed:
  • Krause, Annabelle

    () (IZA)

  • Rinne, Ulf

    () (IZA)

  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    (University of Bonn)

Abstract

Discrimination in recruitment decisions is well documented. Anonymous job applications may reduce discriminatory behavior in hiring. This paper analyzes the potential of this approach in a randomized experiment with fresh Ph.D. economists on the academic job market using data from a European-based economic research institution. If included in the treatment group, characteristics such as name, gender, age, contact details and nationality were removed. Results show that anonymous job applications are in general not associated with a higher or lower probability to receive an invitation for a job interview. However, we find that while female applicants have a higher probability to receive an interview invitation than male applicants with standard applications, this difference disappears with anonymous job applications. We furthermore present evidence that certain professional signals are weighted differently with and without anonymization.

Suggested Citation

  • Krause, Annabelle & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2011. "Anonymous Job Applications of Fresh Ph.D. Economists," IZA Discussion Papers 6100, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6100
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John A. List, 2000. "Interview Scheduling Strategies of New Ph.D. Economists," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 191-201, June.
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    3. Peter Coles & John Cawley & Phillip B. Levine & Muriel Niederle & Alvin E. Roth & John J. Siegfried, 2010. "The Job Market for New Economists: A Market Design Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 187-206, Fall.
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    12. Olof Åslund & Oskar Nordströum Skans, 2012. "Do Anonymous Job Application Procedures Level the Playing Field?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 65(1), pages 82-107, January.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Anonymous applications on the Economics PhD market. Really?
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-12-15 20:55:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Chmura, Thorsten & Goerg, Sebastian J. & Weiss, Pia, 2016. "Natural groups and economic characteristics as driving forces of wage discrimination," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 178-200.
    2. Krause, Annabelle & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2014. "Report No. 63: Abschlussbericht des Projektes ''Anonym Bewerben in Baden-Württemberg''," IZA Research Reports 63, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. João R. Faria & Paulo R. A. Loureiro & Franklin G. Mixon & Adolfo Sachsida, 2016. "Minority Faculty Hiring Power in Academe: an Economic Model," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 43(3), pages 273-288, December.
    4. Luc Behaghel & Bruno Crépon & Thomas Le Barbanchon, 2015. "Unintended Effects of Anonymous Résumés," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 1-27, July.
    5. Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus Zimmermann, 2012. "Anonymous job applications in Europe," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-20, December.
    6. Ulf Rinne, 2013. "The evaluation of immigration policies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 28, pages 530-552 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Chen, Jihui Susan & Liu, Qihong & Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2012. "Where Do New Ph.D. Economists Go? Evidence from Recent Initial Job Placements," IZA Discussion Papers 6990, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Marco Caliendo & Steffen Künn, 2015. "Getting back into the labor market: the effects of start-up subsidies for unemployed females," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 1005-1043, October.
    9. Krause, Annabelle & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "Anonymous job applications of fresh Ph.D. economists," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 441-444.
    10. David Neumark, 2016. "Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 22022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Ulf Rinne, 2014. "Anonymous job applications and hiring discrimination," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-48, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    randomized experiment; anonymous job applications; annual job market; discrimination; Ph.D. economists;

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J79 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Other
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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