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The Impact of Migration on Productivity and Native-Born Workers' Training

Author

Listed:
  • Campo, Francesco

    (University of Milan Bicocca)

  • Forte, Giuseppe

    (King's College London)

  • Portes, Jonathan

    (King's College London)

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between migration and productivity in the UK, using an instrumental variable along the lines suggested by Bianchi, Buonanno and Pinotti (2012). Our results suggest that immigration has a positive and significant impact (in both the statistical sense and more broadly) on productivity, as measured at a geographical level; this appears to be driven by higher-skilled workers. The results for training are less clear, but suggest that higher-skilled immigration may have a positive impact on the training of native workers. We discuss the implications for post-Brexit immigration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Campo, Francesco & Forte, Giuseppe & Portes, Jonathan, 2018. "The Impact of Migration on Productivity and Native-Born Workers' Training," IZA Discussion Papers 11833, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11833
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Peri, Giovanni & Wright, Greg C., 2018. "Immigration, trade and productivity in services: Evidence from U.K. firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 88-108.
    2. Alberto Alesina & Johann Harnoss & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "Birthplace diversity and economic prosperity," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 101-138, June.
    3. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    4. Milo Bianchi & Paolo Buonanno & Paolo Pinotti, 2012. "Do Immigrants Cause Crime?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1318-1347, December.
    5. Michael A. Clemens & Jennifer Hunt, 2019. "The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling Conflicting Results," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 72(4), pages 818-857, August.
    6. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5382 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    8. Trax, Michaela & Brunow, Stephan & Suedekum, Jens, 2015. "Cultural diversity and plant-level productivity," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 85-96.
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    11. Myriam Quispe-Agnoli & Madeline Zavodny, 2002. "The effect of immigration on output mix, capital, and productivity," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 87(Q1), pages 17-27.
    12. Ksenia Koloskova & Ms. Florence Jaumotte & Ms. Sweta Chaman Saxena, 2016. "Impact of Migration on Income Levels in Advanced Economies," IMF Spillover Notes 2016/008, International Monetary Fund.
    13. Ekrame Boubtane & Jean-Christophe Dumont & Christophe Rault, 2016. "Immigration and economic growth in the OECD countries 1986–2006," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 340-360.
    14. Jonathan Portes & Giuseppe Forte, 2017. "The economic impact of Brexit-induced reductions in migration," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(suppl_1), pages 31-44.
    15. Barone, Guglielmo & Mocetti, Sauro, 2011. "With a little help from abroad: The effect of low-skilled immigration on the female labour supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 664-675, October.
    16. Peri, Giovanni & Romiti, Agnese & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2015. "Immigrants, domestic labor and women's retirement decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 18-34.
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    Cited by:

    1. Reegård, Kaja & Dębowski, Horacy, 2020. "Exit, voice or loyalty? VET stakeholders' response to large scale skilled emigration from Poland," International Journal for Research in Vocational Education and Training (IJRVET), European Research Network in Vocational Education and Training (VETNET), European Educational Research Association, vol. 7(3), pages 325-343.
    2. Çakır, Selcen & Erbay, Elif & Kirdar, Murat G., 2021. "Syrian Refugees and Human Capital Accumulation of Native Children in Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 14972, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Maria Esther Oswald-Egg & Michael Siegenthaler, 2021. "Train drain? Access to skilled foreign workers and firms' provision of training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0186, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; productivity; training; Great Britain;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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