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Cognitive (Ir)reflection: New Experimental Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Carlos Cueva Herrero

    () (Dpto. Análisis Económico Aplicado)

  • Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene

    () (Universidad de Alicante)

  • Esther Mata-Pérez

    () (Dpto. Fundamentos del Análisis Económico)

  • Giovanni Ponti

    () (Universidad de Alicante)

  • Marcello Sartarelli

    () (Dpto. Fundamentos del Análisis Económico)

  • Haihan Yu

    (Dpto. Fundamentos del Análisis Económico)

  • Zhukova Vita

    () (Dpto. Fundamentos del Análisis Económico)

Abstract

We study whether cognitive ability explains choices in a wide variety of behavioral tasks, including riskand social preferences, by collecting evidence from almost 1,200 subjects across eight experimentalprojects. Since Frederick (2005)'s Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) has been administered to allsubjects, our dataset is one of the largest in the literature. We divide the subjects pool into three groupsdepending on their CRT performance. Reflective subjects are those answering at least two of the threeCRT questions correctly. Impulsive ones are those who are unable to suppress the instinctive impulseto follow the intuitive although incorrect answer in at least two 2 questions, and the remaining subjectsform a residual group. We find that females score significantly worse than males in the CRT, and intheir wrong answers impulsive ones are observed more frequently. The 2D-4D ratio, which is higherfor females, is correlated negatively with subject's CRT score. In addition, we find that differencesbetween CRT groups in risk aversion depend on the elicitation method used. Finally, impulsive subjectshave higher social preferences, while reflective subjects are more likely to satisfy basic consistencyconditions in lottery choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Cueva Herrero & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene & Esther Mata-Pérez & Giovanni Ponti & Marcello Sartarelli & Haihan Yu & Zhukova Vita, 2015. "Cognitive (Ir)reflection: New Experimental Evidence," Working Papers. Serie AD 2015-02, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  • Handle: RePEc:ivi:wpasad:2015-02
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    Cited by:

    1. Brice Corgnet & Antonio M. Espín & Roberto Hernán-González, 2015. "The cognitive basis of social behavior: cognitive reflection overrides antisocial but not always prosocial motives," Working Papers 15-04, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:160:y:2019:i:c:p:100-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Pablo Brañas-Garza & Praveen Kujal & Balint Lenkei, 2015. "Cognitive Reflection Test: Whom, how, when," Working Papers 15-25, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    4. Alós-Ferrer, Carlos & Hügelschäfer, Sabine, 2016. "Faith in intuition and cognitive reflection," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 61-70.
    5. Cabrales, Antonio & Espin, Antonio & Kujal, Praveen & Rassenti, Stephen, 2017. "Humans' (incorrect) distrust of reflective decisions," CEPR Discussion Papers 11949, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Corgnet, Brice & Espín, Antonio M. & Hernán-González, Roberto & Kujal, Praveen & Rassenti, Stephen, 2016. "To trust, or not to trust: Cognitive reflection in trust games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 20-27.
    7. Jimenez, Natalia & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Tyran, Jean-Robert & Wengström, Erik, 2018. "Thinking fast, thinking badly," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 41-44.
    8. Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Espín, Antonio M. & Garcia, Teresa & Kovářík, Jaromír, 2018. "Digit ratio (2D:4D) predicts pro-social behavior in economic games only for unsatisfied individuals," MPRA Paper 86166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Marcello Sartarelli, 2016. "Handedness, Ability, Earnings and Risk. Evidence from the Lab," Working Papers. Serie AD 2016-04, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    10. Judit Alonso & Roberto Di Paolo & Giovanni Ponti & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Some (Mis)facts about 2D:4D, Preferences and Personality," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-08, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    11. Gian Luigi Albano & Angela Cipollone & Roberto Di Paolo & Giovanni Ponti & Marco Sparro, 2018. "Scoring Rules in Experimental Procurement," Working Papers. Serie AD 2018-02, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    12. Andreoni, James & Koessler, Ann-Kathrin & Serra-Garcia, Marta, 2018. "Who gives? - The Roles of Empathy and Impulsiveness," EconStor Preprints 183140, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    13. Hubert J. Kiss & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia & Vita Zhukova, 2019. "Coopetition in group contest," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1911, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    14. Lucks, Konstantin, 2016. "The Impact of Self-Control on Investment Decisions," MPRA Paper 73099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Andreoni, James & Koessler, Ann-Kathrin & Serra-Garcia, Marta, 2017. "Who Gives? On Empathy and Impulsiveness," EconStor Preprints 194100, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    16. Mark Schneider, 2018. "Modeling Interactions between Risk, Time, and Social Preferences," Working Papers 18-19, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    behavioral economics; cognitive reflection; gender; laboratory experiment; personality;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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