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Persistence Of The Gender Wage Gap: The Role Of The Intergenerational Transmission Of Preferences

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  • Luisa Escriche

    (Universitat de València)

Abstract

This paper provides an explanation of the evolution and persistence of the gender wage gap due to differences in training within the framework of an overlapping generations model with intergenerational transmission of preferences. "Job-priority" and "family-priority" preferences are considered. Firms' policy and the distribution of women's preferences influence each other and are endogenously and simultaneously determined in the long run. The results show though the gender gap in training will diminish, it will also will persist over time. This is because both types of women's preferences coexist at the steady state due to the socialization effort of parents to preserve their own cultural values.

Suggested Citation

  • Luisa Escriche, 2004. "Persistence Of The Gender Wage Gap: The Role Of The Intergenerational Transmission Of Preferences," Working Papers. Serie AD 2004-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  • Handle: RePEc:ivi:wpasad:2004-05
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ivie.es/downloads/docs/wpasad/wpasad-2004-05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gap; firm training; women preferences; cultural transmission;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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