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Macrodynamic Implications of Income Transfer Policies for Human Capital Investment and School Effort


  • Orazem, Peter
  • Tesfatsion, Leigh S.


The distortion in educational investment in poorer children is often attributed to credit market imperfections and hence to the unequal access of children to educational opportunity. However, the distortion might also be attributable to disincentive effects that cause children to make inefficient use of educational opportunities. This possibility is demonstrated for an overlapping generations economy with multiple family dynasties in which children have random unobservable abilities and base their school effort on their parentsム after-tax returns to schooling. Income redistribution can result in suboptimal effort choices that offset the beneficial effects of income transfers and sharply lower social welfare.Annotated pointers to related work can be accessed at

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  • Orazem, Peter & Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 1997. "Macrodynamic Implications of Income Transfer Policies for Human Capital Investment and School Effort," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1683, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:1683

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Marie Viaene & Itzhak Zilcha, 2000. "Optimal Education with Mobile Capital. An OLG Approach (new title: Optimal Public Education under Capital Mobility)," CESifo Working Paper Series 289, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Bernhard Eckwert & Itzhak Zilcha, 2007. "The Effect of Better Information on Income Inequality," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(2), pages 287-307, August.
    3. Koichi Futagami & Mitsuyoshi Yanagihara, 2008. "Private And Public Education: Human Capital Accumulation Under Parental Teaching," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 275-291.
    4. Wozny Lukasz & Growiec Jakub, 2012. "Intergenerational Interactions in Human Capital Accumulation," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-47, June.
    5. Hatsor, Limor, 2012. "Occupational choice: Teacher quality versus teacher quantity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 608-623.
    6. Michael Neugart & Jan Tuinstra, 2003. "Endogenous fluctuations in the demand for education," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 29-51, February.
    7. Ben Mimoun Mohamed, 2005. "Redistribution Through Education and Other Mechanisms Under Capital-Market Imperfections and Uncertainty: A Welfare Effect Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(2), pages 191-236, June.
    8. Haris Munandar, 2008. "Heterogeneous Agents, Human Capital Formation and International Income Inequality," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-015/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Viaene, Jean-Marie & Zilcha, Itzhak, 2002. "Public education under capital mobility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(12), pages 2005-2036, October.
    10. Debasis Bandyopadhyay & Parantap Basu, 2000. "The Growth-Inequality Relationship in a Model with Discrete Occupational Choice and Redistributive Tax," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0809, Econometric Society.
    11. Efraín Rodríguez Lozano, 2011. "¿Barreras Lingüísticas en la Educación?: La Influencia de la Lengua Materna en la Deserción Escolar," Documentos de Trabajo / Working Papers 2011-324, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
    12. Nicolas Bauduin & Joël Hellier, 2006. "Skill Dynamics, Inequality and Social Policies," Working Papers 34, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    13. Leonid Azarnert, 2006. "Free Education: For Whom, Where and When?," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_024, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    14. Limor Hatsor, 2014. "Allocation of Resources in Educational Production: The Budget Puzzle," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 16(6), pages 854-883, December.
    15. Kim, Jae Kyeong, 1997. "Social security trust fund (SSTF), the government fiscal use of the SSTF, and intergenerational equity," ISU General Staff Papers 1997010108000012996, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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