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The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Emerging Asia

  • Morris Goldstein

    ()

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Daniel Xie

    ()

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

This paper analyzes how the global financial crisis has impacted emerging Asia and identifies key characteristics that have made these economies more or less vulnerable to a transmission of crises from the advanced economies. After reviewing how economic outcomes in emerging Asia have evolved since the crisis began in the summer of 2007, Morris Goldstein and Daniel Xie review several studies of the effect of financial stress and/or growth slowdown in advanced economies on emerging Asia. They then discuss how emerging Asia is "different" in ways that matter for the contagion of crises, with the emphasis on currency and maturity mismatches, the nature of the region's foreign trade links (product composition, the geographic pattern of trade, and the degree of net export-led growth), financial market integration with the advanced economies, and the scope for implementing countercyclical monetary and fiscal stimulus.

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Paper provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number WP09-11.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp09-11
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  1. Stephan Danninger & Irina Tytell & Ravi Balakrishnan & Selim Elekdag, 2009. "The Transmission of Financial Stress from Advanced to Emerging Economies," IMF Working Papers 09/133, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Morris GOLDSTEIN & Daniel XIE, 2009. "US Credit Crisis and Spillovers to Asia," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 4(2), pages 204-222.
  3. Philip TURNER, 2007. "Are Banking Systems in East Asia Stronger?," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 2(1), pages 75-95.
  4. Guillermo A. Calvo & Ernesto Talvi, 2005. "Sudden Stop, Financial Factors and Economic Collpase in Latin America: Learning from Argentina and Chile," NBER Working Papers 11153, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Reinhart, Carmen & Reinhart, Vincent, 2000. "What does a G-3 target zone mean for emerging-market economies?," MPRA Paper 14099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Hui Tong & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "The Composition Matters: Capital Inflows and Liquidity Crunch during a Global Economic Crisis," NBER Working Papers 15207, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Forbes, Kristin J. & Chinn, Menzie David, 2003. "A Decomposition Of Global Linkages In Financial Markets Over Time," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4391b5w7, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  8. Paolo Mauro & Andrei A Levchenko, 2006. "Do Some Forms of Financial Flows Help Protect From Sudden Stops?," IMF Working Papers 06/202, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Carmen M. Reinhart & Vincent R. Reinhart, 2008. "Capital Flow Bonanzas: An Encompassing View of the Past and Present," NBER Working Papers 14321, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Forbes, Kristin J., 2010. "Why do foreigners invest in the United States?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 3-21, January.
  11. Barry Eichengreen & Ashoka Mody & Milan Nedeljkovic & Lucio Sarno, 2012. "How the Subprime Crisis Went Global: Evidence from Bank Credit Default Swap Spreads," Working papers 21, National Bank of Serbia.
  12. Arvind Subramanian & Jonathan David Ostry & Simon Johnson, 2007. "The Prospects for Sustained Growth in Africa; Benchmarking the Constraints," IMF Working Papers 07/52, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart & Carlos A. Vegh, 2004. "When it Rains, it Pours: Procyclical Capital Flows and Macroeconomic Policies," NBER Working Papers 10780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Morris Goldstein & Philip Turner, 2004. "Controlling Currency Mismatches in Emerging Markets," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 373, January.
  15. Maurice Obstfeld & Jay C. Shambaugh & Alan M. Taylor, 2009. "Financial Instability, Reserves, and Central Bank Swap Lines in the Panic of 2008," NBER Working Papers 14826, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Pomerleano, Michael, 2009. "What Is the Impact of the Global Financial Crisis on the Banking System in East Asia?," ADBI Working Papers 146, Asian Development Bank Institute.
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