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How does transportation shape Intrametropolitan growth? An answer from the regional express rail

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  • Miquel-Ángel Garcia-López

    () (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona & IEB)

  • Camille Hémet

    () (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

  • Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal

    () (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the influence of transportation infrastructure, and in particular of the Regional Express Rail (RER), on employment and population growth in the Paris metropolitan area between 1968 and 2010. In order to make proper causal inference, we rely on historical instruments and control for all other transportation modes that could be complement or substitute to the RER. A dynamic analysis accounting for spatial heterogeneity reveals that for municipalities located less than 13 kilometers from an RER station, each kilometer closer to the station increases employment and population growth by 12% and 8% respectively. Regarding the time pattern of these effects, we find no impact of the RER expansion on employment growth during the first part of the period, while the effect on population growth appears earlier but declines over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Miquel-Ángel Garcia-López & Camille Hémet & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2015. "How does transportation shape Intrametropolitan growth? An answer from the regional express rail," Working Papers 2015/20, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:doc2015-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Garcia-López, Miquel-Àngel & Hémet, Camille & Viladecans-Marsal, Elisabet, 2017. "Next train to the polycentric city: The effect of railroads on subcenter formation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 50-63.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Urban growth; urban spatial structure; transportation;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning
    • L91 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Transportation: General

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