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Highways, Market Access, and Spatial Sorting

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  • Stephan Fretz
  • Raphael Parchet
  • Frédéric Robert-Nicoud

Abstract

We design a spatial model featuring workers embodied with heterogeneous skills. In equilibrium, locations with improved market access become relatively more attractive to the high-skilled, high-income earners. We then empirically analyze the effects of the construction of the Swiss highway network between 1960 and 2010 on the distribution of income at the local level, as well as on employment and commuting by education level. We find that the advent of a new highway access within 10km led to a long-term 19%-increase of the share of high-income taxpayers and a 6%-decrease of the share of low-income taxpayers. Results are similar for employment data decomposed by education level, as well as for in- and out-commuters. Highways also contributed to job and residential urban sprawl.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan Fretz & Raphael Parchet & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2017. "Highways, Market Access, and Spatial Sorting," CESifo Working Paper Series 6770, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6770
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Santamaria, Marta, 2020. "Reshaping Infrastructure: Evidence from the division of Germany," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1244, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    2. Santamaria, Marta, 2020. "Reshaping Infrastructure : Evidence from the division of Germany," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 456, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Holl, Adelheid & Mariotti, Ilaria, 2018. "Highways and firm performance in the logistics industry," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 139-150.
    4. Luisa Dörr & Stefanie Gäbler, 2020. "Does Highway Accessibility Influence Local Tax Factors? Evidence from German Municipalities," ifo Working Paper Series 321, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    5. Bruno de Borger & Ismir Mulalic & Jan Rouwendal, 2019. "Productivity effects of an exogenous improvement in transport infrastructure: accessibility and the Great Belt Bridge," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 19-065/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    transportation; highway; market access; income sorting;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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