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The Re-engagement in Education of Early School Leavers

Author

Listed:
  • David Black

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Cain Polidano

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Yi-Ping Tseng

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

By OECD standards, the share of the Australian labour force with at least a secondary school qualification is low. One way to rectify this shortfall is to improve rates of re-engagement in education among early school leavers. This paper examines the patterns of re-engagement among early school leavers in the HILDA sample. A key finding is that the early years after leaving school are crucially important, with rates of re-engagement dropping dramatically in the first three years out from school. For those who enter the labour market after school, results suggest that finding work, especially satisfying work, is an important driver for returning to study.

Suggested Citation

  • David Black & Cain Polidano & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2011. "The Re-engagement in Education of Early School Leavers," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2011n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2011n13
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2011n13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maani, Sholeh A. & Kalb, Guyonne, 2007. "Academic performance, childhood economic resources, and the choice to leave school at age 16," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 361-374, June.
    2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1998. "Training and Labour Market Flexibility: Is There a Trade-off?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 36(4), pages 521-536, December.
    3. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-294, August.
    4. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 1-9.
    5. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1995. "Easy Estimation Methods for Discrete-Time Duration Models," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 129-138, February.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Hill, Laura E. & Jepsen, Christopher, 2007. "Positive outcomes from poor starts: Predictors of dropping back in," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 588-603, October.
    8. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    9. Yona Rubinstein & James J. Heckman, 2001. "The Importance of Noncognitive Skills: Lessons from the GED Testing Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 145-149, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cain Polidano & Domenico Tabasso & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2015. "A second chance at education for early school leavers," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 358-375, June.
    2. Cain Polidano & Chris Ryan, 2016. "Long-Term Outcomes from Australian Vocational Education," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n35, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early school leavers; vocational education and training; re-engaging in education;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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