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Lifetime Labor Supply and Human Capital Investments

Author

Listed:
  • Rodolfo Manuelli

    (Washington University in St. Louis and Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

  • Ananth Seshadri

    (University of Wisconsin--Madison)

  • Yongseok Shin

    (Washington University in St. Louis and Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

Abstract

We develop a model of retirement and human capital investment to study the effects of tax and retirement policies. Workers choose the supply of raw labor (career length) and also the human capital embodied in their labor. Our model explains a significant fraction of the US-Europe difference in schooling and retirement. The model predicts that reforms of the European retirement policies modeled after the US can deliver 15-35 percent gains in per-worker output in the long run. Increased human capital investment in and out of school accounts for most of the gains, with relatively small changes in career length. JEL classification: E24; J24

Suggested Citation

  • Rodolfo Manuelli & Ananth Seshadri & Yongseok Shin, 2012. "Lifetime Labor Supply and Human Capital Investments," Working Papers 2012-011, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2012-011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel, Betty C. & Gao, Si, 2015. "Implications of productive government spending for fiscal policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 148-175.
    2. Cai, Zhipeng & Lau, Sau-Him Paul, 2017. "Impact of mortality reductions on years of schooling and expected lifetime labor supply," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 134-144.
    3. Anderberg, Dan & Rainer, Helmut & Roeder, Kerstin, 2018. "Family-specific investments and divorce with dynamically inconsistent households: Marital contracts and policy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 199-225.
    4. Sau-Him Lau, 2013. "Does longevity improvement always raise the length of schooling through the longer-horizon mechanism?," 2013 Meeting Papers 292, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Gustavo Mellior, 2020. "Higher education funding, welfare and inequality in equilibrium," Economics Series Working Papers 908, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Lifetime labor supply; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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