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Cohesive Institutions and Political Violence

Author

Listed:
  • Thiemo Fetzer

    (University of Warwick)

  • Stephan Kyburz

    (Center for Global Development)

Abstract

Can institutionalized transfers of resource rents be a source of civil conflict? Are cohesive institutions better in managing distributive conflicts? We study these questions exploiting exogenous variation in revenue disbursements to local governments together with new data on local democratic institutions in Nigeria. We make three contributions. First, we document the existence of a strong link between rents and conflict far away from the location of the actual resource. Second, we show that distributive conflict is highly organized involving political militias and concentrated in the extent to which local governments are non-cohesive. Third, we show that democratic practice in form having elected local governments significantly weakens the causal link between rents and political violence. We document that elections (vis-a-vis appointments), by producing more cohesive institutions, vastly limit the extent to which distributional conflict between groups breaks out following shocks to the available rents. Throughout, we confirm these findings using individual level survey data.

Suggested Citation

  • Thiemo Fetzer & Stephan Kyburz, 2018. "Cohesive Institutions and Political Violence," HiCN Working Papers 271, Households in Conflict Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:271
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    File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/HiCN-WP-271.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. World Bank, 2013. "Nigeria Economic Report, No. 1, May 2013," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16568, The World Bank.
    2. Stuti Khemani, 2006. "Local Government Accountability for Health Service Delivery in Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 285-312, June.
    3. World Bank, 2002. "State and Local Governance in Nigeria," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15379, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean Lacroix, 2020. "Ballots instead of Bullets? The effect of the Voting Rights Act on political violence," Working Papers CEB WP 20-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    conflict; ethnicity; natural resources; political economy; commodity prices JEL Classification: Q33; O13; N52; R11; L71;

    JEL classification:

    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • N52 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • L71 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Mining, Extraction, and Refining: Hydrocarbon Fuels

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