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Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks

Author

Listed:
  • Giuntella, Osea
  • Mazzonna, Fabrizio
  • Nicodemo, Catia
  • Vargas-Silva, Carlos

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of immigration on the allocation of occupational physical burden and work injury risks. Using data for England and Wales from the Labour Force Survey (2003-2013), we find that, on average, immigration leads to a reallocation of UK-born workers towards jobs characterized by lower physical burden and injury risk. The results also show important differences across skill groups. Immigration reduces the average physical burden of UK-born workers with medium levels of education, but has no significant effect on those with low levels. We also find that that immigration led to an improvement selfreported measures of native workers’ health. These findings, together with the evidence that immigrants report lower injury rates than natives, suggest that the reallocation of tasks could reduce overall health care costs and the human and financial costs typically associated with workplace injuries.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuntella, Osea & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Nicodemo, Catia & Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2018. "Immigration and the Reallocation of Work Health Risks," GLO Discussion Paper Series 215, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:215
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri & Greg C. Wright, 2016. "Immigration, Offshoring, and American Jobs," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 4, pages 117-151 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    Cited by:

    1. Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2017. "The impact of hosting refugees on the intra-household allocation of tasks: A gender perspective," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Giuntella, Osea & Lonsky, Jakub, 2018. "The Effects of DACA on Health Insurance, Access to Care, and Health Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11469, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; labor-market; physical burden; work-related injuries; health;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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