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Mexican Immigrant Employment Outcomes over the Business Cycle

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  • Pia M. Orrenius
  • Madeline Zavodny

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "Mexican Immigrant Employment Outcomes over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 316-320, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:100:y:2010:i:2:p:316-20
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.100.2.316
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bernt Bratsberg & Erling Barth & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2006. "Local Unemployment and the Relative Wages of Immigrants: Evidence from the Current Population Surveys," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 243-263, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Couch, Kenneth A. & Fairlie, Robert W. & Xu, Huanan, 2020. "The Impacts of COVID-19 on Minority Unemployment: First Evidence from April 2020 CPS Microdata," IZA Discussion Papers 13264, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Couch, Kenneth A. & Fairlie, Robert W. & Xu, Huanan, 2020. "Early evidence of the impacts of COVID-19 on minority unemployment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 192(C).
    3. Vincent Fromentin, 2016. "The Global Economic Crisis and Migrant Workers: The Case of the Construction Sector in Europe," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 147-163, March.
    4. Jordan A. Arellanes & Ruben P. Viramontez Anguiano & Brenda J. Lohman, 2017. "The Desire to Thrive: Families Overcoming Economic Hardships Through Educational Aspirations," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 338-353, September.
    5. Lessem, Rebecca & Nakajima, Kayuna, 2019. "Immigrant wages and recessions: Evidence from undocumented Mexicans," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 92-115.
    6. Osea Giuntella & Fabrizio Mazzonna & Catia Nicodemo & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2019. "Immigration and the reallocation of work health risks," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(3), pages 1009-1042, July.
    7. Alan Barrett & Elish Kelly, 2012. "The Impact of Ireland’s Recession on the Labour Market Outcomes of its Immigrants [L’impact de la récession en Irlande sur le devenir de ses immigrés sur le marché du travail]," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 28(1), pages 91-111, February.
    8. Nora Prean & Karin Mayr, 2012. "Unemployment of immigrants and natives over the business cycle: evidence from the Austrian labor market," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012019, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    9. Sergei Guriev & Biagio Speciale & Michele Tuccio, 2019. "How do Regulated and Unregulated Labor Markets Respond to Shocks? Evidence from Immigrants During the Great Recession," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(1), pages 37-76.
    10. Lee, Tae Hoon & Peri, Giovanni & Viarengo, Martina, 2020. "The Gender Aspect of Immigrants' Assimilation in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 13922, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Sparber, Chad & Fan, Jasmine Sijie, 2011. "Unemployment, Skills, and the Business Cycle Since 2000," Working Papers 2011-04, Department of Economics, Colgate University, revised 12 Sep 2012.
    12. Chizheng Miao, 2020. "Immigrant self‐employment and local unemployment in Sweden," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 88(3), pages 464-488, June.
    13. Kris Inwood & Chris Minns & Fraser Summerfield, 2016. "Reverse assimilation? Immigrants in the Canadian labour market during the Great Depression," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(3), pages 299-321.
    14. Brian C. Cadena & Brian K. Kovak, 2016. "Immigrants Equilibrate Local Labor Markets: Evidence from the Great Recession," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 257-290, January.
    15. Julia Shu-Huah Wang & Neeraj Kaushal, 2018. "Health and Mental Health Effects of Local Immigration Enforcement," NBER Working Papers 24487, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Mercè Sala-Rios & Teresa Torres-Solé & Mariona Farré-Perdiguer, 2018. "Immigrants’ employment and the business cycle in Spain: taking account of gender and origin," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 35(2), pages 463-490, August.
    17. Adriano Paggiaro, 2013. "How do immigrants fare during the downturn? Evidence from matching comparable natives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(8), pages 229-258.
    18. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2011. "Trends in poverty and inequality among Hispanics," Working Papers 1109, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    19. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2014. "The global economic crisis and the effect of immigration on the employment of native-born workers in Europe," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-22, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition

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