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Immigrants in Risky Occupations

  • Orrenius, Pia M.

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas)

  • Zavodny, Madeline

    ()

    (Agnes Scott College)

This chapter reviews the economics literature on immigrant-native differentials in occupational risk. It begins by briefly explaining the theory of compensating wage differentials. It then provides a more detailed discussion of the empirical evidence on the subject, which reaches several conclusions. First, immigrants are overrepresented in occupations and industries with higher injury and fatality rates. Second, immigrants have higher work-related injury and fatality rates in some advanced economies, but not all. Finally, most, but not all, immigrants appear to earn risk premiums similar to natives for working in risky jobs. The chapter closes with a discussion of areas where additional research is needed.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6693.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Amelie F. Constant and Klaus F. Zimmermann (eds.), The International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, Edward Elgar 2013, Cheltenham, UK, and Northampton, 214-226
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6693
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  1. Antecol, Heather & Bedard, Kelly, 2005. "Unhealthy Assimilation: Why Do Immigrants Converge to American Health Status Levels?," IZA Discussion Papers 1654, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Pia Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "From brawn to brains: how immigration works for America," Annual Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  3. Bollini, Paola & Siem, Harald, 1995. "No real progress towards equity: Health of migrants and ethnic minorities on the eve of the year 2000," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 819-828, September.
  4. Bonin, Holger & Constant, Amelie & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 2007. "Ethnic Persistence, Assimilation and Risk Proclivity," CEPR Discussion Papers 6084, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Borjas, George J, 1995. "Assimilation and Changes in Cohort Quality Revisited: What Happened to Immigrant Earnings in the 1980s?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 201-45, April.
  6. Joni Hersch & W. Kip Viscusi, 2010. "Immigrant Status and the Value of Statistical Life," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(3).
  7. Alberto Dávila & Marie T. Mora & Rebecca González, 2011. "English-Language Proficiency and Occupational Risk Among Hispanic Immigrant Men in the United States," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 263-296, 04.
  8. Holger Bonin & Amelie Constant & Konstantinos Tatsiramos & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2006. "Native-Migrant Differences in Risk Attitudes," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 560, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  9. Bauer, Thomas K. & Million, Andreas & Rotte, Ralph & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1998. "Immigration Labor and Workplace Safety," IZA Discussion Papers 16, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline, 2009. "Do immigrants work in riskier jobs?," Working Papers 0901, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  11. Viscusi, W Kip, 1993. "The Value of Risks to Life and Health," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 1912-46, December.
  12. Marvasti, Akbar, 2008. "Occupational Safety and English Language Proficiency," MPRA Paper 14490, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2009.
  13. repec:sae:ilrrev:v:32:y:1979:i:3:p:339-362 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Robert S. Smith, 1979. "Compensating Wage Differentials and Public Policy: A Review," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 32(3), pages 339-352, April.
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