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Occupational Safety and English Language Proficiency

  • Marvasti, Akbar

Recent occupational injury data shows a rising trend, which happens to coincide with both increases in the population of foreign born in the U.S. and with changes in its composition. This study aims at exploring the presence of a statistical relationship between occupational injuries and the level of English proficiency of foreign born using cross-sectional data on the rate of injury and count of injury incidents. A cultural gap hypothesis is also examined as an alternative explanation for the rise in work injuries. While there is some support for the adverse effect of inadequate English language proficiency of foreign born, the results for the cultural gap hypothesis are more robust.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14490/1/MPRA_paper_14490.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 14490.

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Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision: Mar 2009
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14490
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