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Occupational Safety and English Language Proficiency

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  • Akbar Marvasti

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Abstract

Recent occupational injury data shows a rising trend, which happens to coincide with both increases in the population of foreign born in the U.S. and with changes in its composition. This study aims at exploring the presence of a statistical relationship between occupational injuries and the level of English proficiency of foreign born using cross-sectional data on the rate of injury and count of injury incidents. A cultural gap hypothesis is also examined as an alternative explanation for the rise in work injuries. While there is some support for the adverse effect of inadequate English language proficiency of foreign born, the results for the cultural gap hypothesis are more robust.
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Suggested Citation

  • Akbar Marvasti, 2010. "Occupational Safety and English Language Proficiency," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 332-347, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabre:v:31:y:2010:i:4:p:332-347
    DOI: 10.1007/s12122-010-9096-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Cristina Borra, 2013. "On the differential impact of the recent economic downturn on work safety by nativity: the Spanish experience," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-26, December.
    2. Martina Cioni & Marco savioli, 2011. "Accidents and illnesses at the workplace Evidence from Italy," Department of Economics University of Siena 608, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    3. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2013. "Immigrants in risky occupations," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 11, pages 214-226 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational safety; Language proficiency; J28; J88;

    JEL classification:

    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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