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Are Men Really More Overconfident than Women? - A Natural Field Experiment on Exam Behavior

  • Johansson Stenman, Olof

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Nordblom, Katarina

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

This paper reports from a simple natural field experiment based on an eco-nomics exam. Part of the exam consisted of 30 multiple choice questions, where the students obtained 1 point per correct answer while 1 point was deducted for each in-correct answer. We find no significant gender differences in overconfidence, irrespec-tive of how we measure it, i.e., whether we regard the number of questions answered, the number of questions answered incorrectly or the answering patterns for the most difficult questions. Hence, the data provides no support for the frequently proposed hypothesis that men are more overconfident than women.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/23021
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Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 461.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 03 Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0461
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/

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  9. Chevalier, Arnaud & Gibbons, Steve & Thorpe, Andy & Snell, Martin & Hoskins, Sherria, 2007. "Students' Academic Self-Perception," IZA Discussion Papers 3031, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  12. Dreber, Anna & Emma, von Essen & Ranehill, Eva, 2009. "Outrunning the Gender Gap – Boys and Girls Compete Equally," Research Papers in Economics 2009:17, Stockholm University, Department of Economics, revised 01 Mar 2010.
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