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Male and Female Marriage Returns to Schooling

  • Bruze, Gustaf

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

Registered author(s):

    A collective marriage matching model is estimated and calibrated to quantify the share of returns to schooling that is realized through marriage. The predictions of the model are matched with US data on the relationship between schooling and wage rates, the division of time within the household, and the extent to which men and women sort positively on several traits in marriage. Counterfactual analysis conducted with the model, suggests that US middle aged men and women are earning in the order of 30 percent of their return to schooling through improved marital outcomes.

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    File URL: http://www.hha.dk/nat/wper/10-17_gustb.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 10-17.

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    Length: 54 pages
    Date of creation: 01 Nov 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2010_017
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark

    Phone: +45 89 486396
    Fax: +45 8615 5175
    Web page: http://www.asb.dk/departments/nat.aspx

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    1. Michael Peters & Aloysius Siow, 2000. "Competing Pre-marital Investments," Working Papers peters-00-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    2. Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Bernard Fortin & Guy Lacroix, 2002. "Marriage Market, Divorce Legislation, and Household Labor Supply," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 37-72, February.
    3. Hadfield, Gillian K., 1999. "A coordination model of the sexual division of labor," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 125-153, October.
    4. Matthew J. Baker & Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2007. "Marriage, Specialization, and the Gender Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 763-793.
    5. Chiappori, Pierre-André & Iyigun, Murat & Weiss, Yoram, 2006. "Investment in Schooling and the Marriage Market," IZA Discussion Papers 2454, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Lars Lefgren & Frank McIntyre, 2006. "The Relationship between Women's Education and Marriage Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 787-830, October.
    7. Del Boca, Daniela & Flinn, Christopher, 2005. "Household Time Allocation and Modes of Behavior: A Theory of Sorts," IZA Discussion Papers 1821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Jeanne Lafortune, 2013. "Making Yourself Attractive: Pre-marital Investments and the Returns to Education in the Marriage Market," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 151-78, April.
    9. Shannon Seitz & Aloysius Siow & Eugene Choo, 2010. "The Collective Marriage Matching Model: Identification, Estimation and Testing," 2010 Meeting Papers 267, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi & Thomas Siedler, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Marital Sorting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(513), pages 659-679, 07.
    11. Murat Nick & P. Randall Walsh, 2007. "Building the Family Nest: Premarital Investments, Marriage Markets, and Spousal Allocations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 507-535.
    12. Eugene Choo & Aloysius Siow, 2006. "Who Marries Whom and Why," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(1), pages 175-201, February.
    13. Eugene Choo & Shannon Seitz & Aloysuis Siow, 2008. "The Collective Marriage Matching Model: Identification, Estimation and Testing," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 704, Boston College Department of Economics.
    14. Linda Y. Wong, 2003. "Why so only 5.5% of Black Men Marry White Women?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(3), pages 803-826, 08.
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