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The impact of shocks on gender-differentiated asset dynamics in Bangladesh:

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  • Rakib, Muntaha
  • Matz, Julia Anna

Abstract

Assets are an important means of coping with adverse events in developing countries but the role of gendered ownership is not yet fully understood. This paper investigates changes in assets owned by the household head, his spouse, or jointly by both of them in response to shocks in rural agricultural households in Bangladesh with the help of detailed household survey panel data. Land is owned mostly by men, who are wealthier than their spouses with respect to almost all types of assets, but relative ownership varies by type of asset.

Suggested Citation

  • Rakib, Muntaha & Matz, Julia Anna, 2014. "The impact of shocks on gender-differentiated asset dynamics in Bangladesh:," IFPRI discussion papers 1356, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1356
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ngigi, Marther W. & Mueller, Ulrike & Birner, Regina, 2016. "Gender differences in climate change perceptions and adaptation strategies: an intra-household analysis from rural Kenya," Discussion Papers 232900, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    2. repec:bla:devpol:v:36:y:2018:i:1:p:3-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Iqbal, Muhammad & Ahmad, Munir & Mustafa, Ghulam, 2015. "Climate Change, Vulnerability, Food Security and Human Health in Rural Pakistan: A Gender Perspective," MPRA Paper 72866, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Women; assets; Ownership; households; income; Economic development; Land ownership; Food production; shocks; coping strategies;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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