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Migration and the autonomy of women left behind

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  • Julia Anna Matz
  • Linguère Mously Mbaye

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of migration of male household heads on the autonomy of their spouses. Using panel household survey data from Ethiopia, the methodology mainly relies on an instrumental variables approach that addresses the endogeneity inherent in the relationship using past migration as the instrument and carefully paying attention to the role of remittances. We find consistent evidence that male migration increases female self-determination and decision-making power, and (to a lesser extent) the ability to protect one's interests.

Suggested Citation

  • Julia Anna Matz & Linguère Mously Mbaye, 2017. "Migration and the autonomy of women left behind," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-64, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2017-64
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2017-64_1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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