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Internal migration and household living conditions in Ethiopia

Author

Listed:
  • Blessing Mberu

    (African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC))

Abstract

Using the 1998 Migration, Gender and Health Survey in Five Regions of Ethiopia, and multivariate regression techniques, this paper examines the relationship between internal migration and household living conditions. The analysis finds significant living condition advantage of permanent and temporary migrants over non-migrants. These advantages are primarily linked to migration selectivity by education and non-agricultural income. Once the independent effects of these variables are controlled, no statistical significant independent association exists between migration status and living conditions. Government policies of resettlement in the 1980s and ethnic federalism of the 1990s may have engendered stress migration and exacerbated poor living outcomes for return migrants. The resort to migration and/or resettlement as an individual or government policy response to periodic unfavorable conditions in places of origin is not strongly supported by this analysis as the key to improved living conditions. Promoting higher education and opportunities for employment outside the agricultural sector are more likely to yield improved living conditions in Ethiopia.

Suggested Citation

  • Blessing Mberu, 2006. "Internal migration and household living conditions in Ethiopia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(21), pages 509-540.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:14:y:2006:i:21
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2006.14.21
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol14/21/14-21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:rss:jnljse:v3i2p2 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sharma, Rasadhika & Grote, Ulrike, 2019. "Who is an internal migrant?," TVSEP Working Papers wp-013, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics, Project TVSEP.
    3. Atsede Desta Tegegne & Marianne Penker, 2016. "Determinants of rural out-migration in Ethiopia: Who stays and who goes?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(34), pages 1011-1044.
    4. Dorosh, Paul A. & Schmidt, Emily, 2010. "The rural-urban transformation in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. repec:bla:popdev:v:44:y:2018:i:3:p:455-488 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:wdevel:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:447-466 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Eldridge Moses & Derek Yu, 2009. "Migration from the Northern Cape," SALDRU Working Papers 32, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    8. Mussa, E.C. & Mirzabaev, A. & Admassie, A. & Rukundo, E.N., 2018. "Effects of childhood work on long-term out-migration decision in rural Ethiopia," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 276004, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Raphael Nawrotzki & Fernando Riosmena & Lori Hunter, 2013. "Do Rainfall Deficits Predict U.S.-Bound Migration from Rural Mexico? Evidence from the Mexican Census," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(1), pages 129-158, February.
    10. Nigussie Abadi & Ataklti Techane & Girmay Tesfay & Daniel Maxwell & Bapu Vaitla, 2018. "The impact of remittances on household food security: A micro perspective from Tigray, Ethiopia," WIDER Working Paper Series 040, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. D. Omariba & Michael Boyle, 2010. "Rural–Urban Migration and Cross-National Variation in Infant Mortality in Less Developed Countries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(3), pages 275-296, June.
    12. de Brauw, Alan & Mueller, Valerie & Woldehanna, Tassew, 2013. "Does internal migration improve overall well-being in Ethiopia?:," ESSP working papers 55, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Rachel Goldberg, 2013. "Family Instability and Early Initiation of Sexual Activity in Western Kenya," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 725-750, April.
    14. Raphael Nawrotzki & Lori Hunter & Thomas W. Dickinson, 2012. "Natural resources and rural livelihoods," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(24), pages 661-700.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    internal migration; migration; resettlement; Civil War; drought; famine; stress migration; living conditions index; living conditions;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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