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Do shocks affect men's and women's assets differently?: A review of literature and new evidence from Bangladesh and Uganda


  • Quisumbing, Agnes R.
  • Kumar, Neha
  • Behrman, Julia A.


This background paper attempts to expand our understanding of the gender-differentiated impact of shocks on assets through a literature review on shocks and gendered asset dynamics and an analysis of new panel data (2007 and 2009) from Uganda and Bangladesh looking at the impact of negative shocks and positive events on men's and women's assets. We take advantage of detailed assets and shocks modules to disaggregate the type of shock between covariate and idiosyncratic shocks and types of assets according to ownership (joint, husband's, and wife's assets). We also consider the impact of life-cycle events such as dowry payments and receipts, and inheritance. Estimation of an asset accumulation regression as a function of covariate and idiosyncratic shocks, with controls for baseline characteristics and asset stocks, finds that although many shocks are similar in both countries, commonly experienced shocks do not necessarily have the same effects across countries and on men's, women's, and jointly owned assets within countries. Land and assets in general were relatively well insured against food price increases in Bangladesh, but jointly held assets and wives' assets in Uganda were negatively affected. Weather shocks negatively impact husbands' assets and wives' assets in Bangladesh and Uganda, respectively. Reflecting differences in country and context, dowry and wedding expenses took their toll on wives' land in Bangladesh, and illness shocks also had a large detrimental impact on wives' assets in Bangladesh, while death negatively affected wives' assets in Uganda. Within households, however, it appears that in Bangladesh, husbands' land and assets were more negatively affected by covariate shocks relative to wives' assets, whereas in Uganda, husbands' assets were relatively protected against covariate shocks relative to wives' assets.

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  • Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Kumar, Neha & Behrman, Julia A., 2011. "Do shocks affect men's and women's assets differently?: A review of literature and new evidence from Bangladesh and Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1113

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    2. Morley, Samuel & Piñeiro, Valeria & Robinson, Sherman, 2011. "External shocks and policy alternatives in small open economies: The case of El Salvador," IFPRI discussion papers 1134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    5. Katia Covarrubias & Longin Nsiima & Alberto Zezza, 2012. "Livestock and Livelihoods in Rural Tanzania : A Descriptive Analysis of the 2009 National Panel Survey," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17886, The World Bank.
    6. Glendenning, Claire J. & Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Babu, Suresh C., 2011. "Evaluation of value-added agricultural advisory services: Case study of agriclinics in Southern India," IFPRI discussion papers 1125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    8. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Johnson, Nancy & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Njuki, Jemimah & Behrman, Julia A. & Rubin, Deborah & Peterman, Amber & Waithanji, Elizabeth, 2011. "Gender, assets, and agricultural development programs: A conceptual framework:," CAPRi working papers 99, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Morley, Samuel & Piñeiro, Valeria & Robinson, Sherman, 2011. "A dynamic computable general equilibrium model with working capital for Honduras:," IFPRI discussion papers 1130, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Rakib, Muntaha & Matz, Julia Anna, 2014. "The Impact of Shocks on Gender-differentiated Asset Dynamics in Bangladesh," Discussion Papers 179690, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    11. Yu, Bingxin & Nin-Pratt, Alejandro & Funes, José & Gemessa, Sinafikeh Asrat, 2011. "Cereal production and technology adoption in Ethiopia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1131, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    13. Kumar, Neha & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2014. "Gender and resilience:," IFPRI book chapters,in: Fan, Shenggen & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul & Yosef, Sivan (ed.), 2013 Global Food Policy Report, chapter 17 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Bernier, Quinn & Haglund, Eric, 2013. "The six "ins" of climate-smart agriculture: Inclusive institutions for information, innovation, investment, and insurance:," CAPRi working papers 114, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Prasad, Sanjay K. & Pullabhotla, Hemant & Ganesh-Kumar, A., 2011. "Supply and demand for cereals in Nepal, 2010–2030:," IFPRI discussion papers 1120, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    17. Cai, Ximing & Yang, Yi-Chen E. & Zhao, Jianshi & Ringler, Claudia, 2011. "Can water allocation in the Yellow River basin be improved?: Insights from a multi-agent system model," IFPRI discussion papers 1117, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    18. Zambrano, Patricia & Maldonado, Jorge H. & Mendoza, Sandra L. & Ruiz, Lorena & Fonseca, Luz Amparo & Cardona, Iván, 2011. "Women cotton farmers: Their perceptions and experiences with transgenic varieties: A case study for Colombia," IFPRI discussion papers 1118, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Liu, Yanyan, 2011. "Impacts of an early education intervention on students' learning achievement: Evidence from the Philippines," IFPRI discussion papers 1121, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Shocks; Gender; assets;


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