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Parallel Realities: Exploring Poverty Dynamics Using Mixed Methods in Rural Bangladesh


  • Peter Davis
  • Bob Baulch


This paper explores the implications of using two methodological approaches to study poverty dynamics in rural Bangladesh. Using data from a unique longitudinal study, we show how different methods lead to very different assessments of socio-economic mobility. We suggest five ways of reconciling these differences: considering assets in addition to expenditures, proximity to the poverty line, other aspects of well-being, household division, and qualitative recall errors. Considering assets and proximity to the poverty line along with expenditures resolves three-fifths of the qualitative and quantitative differences. Use of such integrated mixed-methods can therefore improve the reliability of poverty dynamics research.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Davis & Bob Baulch, 2011. "Parallel Realities: Exploring Poverty Dynamics Using Mixed Methods in Rural Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 118-142.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:1:p:118-142
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2010.492860

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shaffer, Paul, 2013. "Ten Years of “Q-Squared”: Implications for Understanding and Explaining Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 269-285.
    2. Orr, Alastair & Tsusaka, Taku & Kee-Tui, Sabine & Msere, Harry, 2015. "What do we mean by 'women's crops'? Commercialisation, gender, and the power to name," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212600, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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