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Interpersonal, Intertemporal and Spatial Variation in Risk Perceptions: Evidence from East Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Cheryl Doss

    () (Yale University)

  • John McPeak

    () (Syracuse University)

  • Christopher Barrett

    () (Cornell University)

Abstract

This study investigates variation over time, space and household and individual characteristics in how people perceive different risks. Using original data from the arid and semi-arid lands of east Africa, we explore which risks concern individuals and how they assess their relative level of concern about these identified risks. Because these assessments were gathered for multiple time periods, sites, households and individuals within households, we are able to identify the degree to which risk perceptions vary across time, across communities, across households within a community, and across individuals within a household. We find the primary determinants of risk rankings to be changing community level variables over time, with household specific and individual specific variables exhibiting much less influence. This suggests that community based planning and monitoring of development efforts that address risk exposure should be prioritized. We also find that individuals throughout this area are most concerned about food security overall, so that development efforts that directly address this problem should be given the highest priority.

Suggested Citation

  • Cheryl Doss & John McPeak & Christopher Barrett, 2006. "Interpersonal, Intertemporal and Spatial Variation in Risk Perceptions: Evidence from East Africa," Working Papers 948, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:948
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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp948.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2004. "Food Aid Targeting, Shocks And Private Transfers Among East African Pastoralists," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20247, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    9. Christine M. Moser & Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "The complex dynamics of smallholder technology adoption: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 373-388, November.
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    11. Haro, Guyo O. & Doyo, Godana J. & McPeak, John G., 2005. "Linkages Between Community, Environmental, and Conflict Management: Experiences from Northern Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 285-299, February.
    12. John G. McPeak, 2003. "Analyzing and Addressing Localized Degradation in the Commons," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 515-536.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cervellati, Matteo & Esposito, Elena & Sunde, Uwe & Valmori, Simona, 2016. "Malaria Risk and Civil Violence," CEPR Discussion Papers 11496, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Joshua J. Ramisch, 2016. "“Never at ease”: cellphones, multilocational households, and the metabolic rift in western Kenya," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), pages 979-995.
    3. Gloede, Oliver & Menkhoff, Lukas & Waibel, Hermann, 2015. "Shocks, Individual Risk Attitude, and Vulnerability to Poverty among Rural Households in Thailand and Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, pages 54-78.
    4. Marc Rockmore, 2017. "The Cost of Fear: The Welfare Effect of the Risk of Violence in Northern Uganda," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, pages 650-669.
    5. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Kumar, Neha & Behrman, Julia A., 2011. "Do shocks affect men's and women's assets differently?: A review of literature and new evidence from Bangladesh and Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. van den Berg, Marrit & Fort, Ricardo & Burger, Kees, 2009. "Natural Hazards And Risk Aversion: Experimental Evidence From Latin America," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51394, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Bishu, Kinfe & O'Reilly, Seamus & Lahiff, Edward & Steiner, Bodo, 2016. "Cattle farmers’ perceptions of risk and risk management strategies," MPRA Paper 74954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Moya, A., 2012. "Violence, Emotional Distress and Induced Changes in Risk Aversion among the Displaced Population in Colombia," Working papers 105, Rimisp Latin American Center for Rural Development.
    9. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2011. "Do men and women accumulate assets in different ways?: Evidence from rural Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 1096, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. repec:eee:wdevel:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:138-152 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Nguyen, Trung Thanh & Nguyen, Loc Duc & Lippe, Rattiya Suddeephong & Grote, Ulrike, 2017. "Determinants of Farmers’ Land Use Decision-Making: Comparative Evidence From Thailand and Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 199-213.
    12. Bigsten, Arne & Tengstam, Sven, 2008. "Smallholder Income Diversification in Zambia: The Way Out of Poverty?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54490, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    13. Balgah, Roland Azibo & Buchenrieder, Gertrud, 2011. "Effects of Natural Shocks on Risk Behavior. Experimental Evidence from Cameroon," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114215, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Sudha Narayanan, 2012. "Safe gambles? Farmer perceptions of transactional certainty and risk-return tradeoffs in contract farming schemes in Southern India," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2012-021, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    15. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:262-274 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    risk ranking; risk perceptions; intrahousehold; Africa; Kenya; Ethiopia;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General

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