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Preference Heterogeneity in Experiments: Comparing the Field and Laboratory

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  • Steffen Andersen

    ()

  • Glenn W. Harrison

    ()

  • Morten Igel Lau

    ()

  • E. Elisabet Rutström

    ()

Abstract

Do laboratory experiments provide a reliable basis for measuring field preferences? Economists recognize that preferences can differ across individuals, but only a few attempts have been made to elicit individual preferences for representative samples of a population in a particular geographical area, region or country. Our primary objective is to directly compare estimates of preferences elicited from a convenience sample and the estimates for the wider population from which that sample is drawn. We examine the strengths and weaknesses of laboratory and field experiments to detect differences in preferences over risk and time that are associated with standard, observable characteristics of the individual.

Suggested Citation

  • Steffen Andersen & Glenn W. Harrison & Morten Igel Lau & E. Elisabet Rutström, 2009. "Preference Heterogeneity in Experiments: Comparing the Field and Laboratory," Post-Print hal-00736951, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00736951
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2009.09.006
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00736951
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