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Discussions Among the Poor: Exploring Poverty Dynamics With Focus Groups in Bangladesh

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  • Peter Davis

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Abstract

Findings from 116 focus group discussions are presented, which took place in eleven districts in Bangladesh in mid-2006. It forms the first part of three phases of research in an integrated qualitative and quantitative study into poverty dynamics currently being undertaken by the author and partners from the CPRC, IFPRI and DATA Bangladesh. The central purpose of the focus group discussions was to inform subsequent phases of the research by exploring reasons perceived by participants for decline or improvement in people’s well-being in their communities, and the hindrances to improvement for the chronically poor [CPRC WP No. 84].

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  • Peter Davis, 2007. "Discussions Among the Poor: Exploring Poverty Dynamics With Focus Groups in Bangladesh," Working Papers id:1106, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1106
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hallman, Kelly & Lewis, David & Begum, Suraiya, 2003. "An integrated economic and social analysis to assess the impact of vegetable and fishpond technologies on poverty in rural Bangladesh:," EPTD discussion papers 112, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
    3. Maristella Botticini & Aloysius Siow, 2003. "Why Dowries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1385-1398, September.
    4. Kabeer, Naila, 2001. "Conflicts Over Credit: Re-Evaluating the Empowerment Potential of Loans to Women in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 63-84, January.
    5. Hallman, Kelly & Lewis, David & Begum, Suraiya, 2003. "An integrated economic and social analysis to assess the impact of vegetable and fishpond technologies on poverty in rural Bangladesh," FCND briefs 163, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Ben Rogaly & Daniel Coppard & Abdur Safique & Kumar Rana & Amrita Sengupta & Jhuma Biswas, 2002. "Seasonal Migration and Welfare/Illfare in Eastern India: A Social Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(5), pages 89-114.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thorat, Amit & Vanneman, Reeve & Desai, Sonalde & Dubey, Amaresh, 2017. "Escaping and Falling into Poverty in India Today," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 413-426.
    2. Muntaha Rakib & Julia Anna Matz, 2016. "The Impact of Shocks on Gender-differentiated Asset Dynamics in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 377-395, March.
    3. Hari Ram Lohano, 2009. "Poverty Dynamics in Rural Sindh, Pakistan," Working Papers id:2334, eSocialSciences.
    4. Anirudh Krishna, 2011. "Characteristics and Patterns of Intergenerational Poverty Traps and Escapes in Rural North India," Working Papers id:3940, eSocialSciences.
    5. Md. Zahidul Hassan & Wahid Quabili & Mohammad Zobair & Bob Baulch & Agnes Quisumbing, 2011. "Sampling and survey design of the Bangladesh long-term impact study," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 281-296.
    6. Agnes R. Quisumbing & Bob Baulch, 2013. "Assets and Poverty Traps in Rural Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(7), pages 898-916, July.
    7. Jonathan Rigg & Tuan Anh Nguyen & Thi Thu Huong Luong, 2014. "The Texture of Livelihoods: Migration and Making a Living in Hanoi," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 368-382, March.
    8. Daniel Clarke & Francesca de Nicola & Ruth Vargas Hill & Neha Kumar & Parendi Mehta, 2015. "A Chat about Insurance: Experimental Results from Rural Bangladesh," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 37(3), pages 477-501.
    9. Jackeline Velazco & Ramon Ballester, 2016. "Food Access and Shocks in Rural Households: Evidence from Bangladesh and Ethiopia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(2), pages 527-549, November.

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