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The Interaction and Sequencing of Policy Reforms

Author

Listed:
  • Kehoe, Timothy J.

    (University of Minnesota)

  • Asturias, Jose

    (School of Foreign Service in Qatar, Georgetown University)

  • Hur, Sewon

    (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Ruhl, Kim J.

    (Stern School of Business, New York University)

Abstract

In what order should a developing country adopt policy reforms? Do some policies complement each other? Do others substitute for each other? To address these questions, we develop a two-country dynamic general equilibrium model with entry and exit of firms that are monopolistic competitors. Distortions in the model include barriers to entry of firms, barriers to international trade, and barriers to contract enforcement. We find that a reform that reduces one of these distortions has different effects depending on the other distortions present. In particular, reforms to trade barriers and barriers to the entry of new firms are substitutable, as are reforms to contract enforcement and trade barriers. In contrast, reforms to contract enforcement and the barriers to entry are complementary. Finally, the optimal sequencing of reforms requires reforming trade barriers before contract enforcement.

Suggested Citation

  • Kehoe, Timothy J. & Asturias, Jose & Hur, Sewon & Ruhl, Kim J., 2015. "The Interaction and Sequencing of Policy Reforms," Staff Report 521, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmsr:521
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrew B. Bernard & Jonathan Eaton & J. Bradford Jensen & Samuel Kortum, 2003. "Plants and Productivity in International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1268-1290, September.
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    5. Raphael Bergoeing & Norman V. Loayza & Facundo Piguillem, 2016. "The Whole is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts: Complementary Reforms to Address Microeconomic Distortions," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 268-305.
    6. Thomas Chaney, 2008. "Distorted Gravity: The Intensive and Extensive Margins of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1707-1721, September.
    7. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2006. "Globalization and the Gains From Variety," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 541-585.
    8. Nauro F. Campos & Abrizio Coricelli, 2002. "Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don't, and What We Should," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 793-836, September.
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    10. Marc J. Melitz, 2003. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1695-1725, November.
    11. Michael Waugh & Ina Simonovska, 2012. "Different Trade Models, Different Trade Elasticities?," 2012 Meeting Papers 618, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Timothy J. Kehoe & Felipe Meza, 2011. "Catch-up growth followed by stagnation: Mexico, 1950–2010," Working Papers 693, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    13. Timothy Kehoe & Sewon Hur & Kim Ruhl & Jose Asturias, 2016. "Firm Entry and Exit and Aggregate Growth," 2016 Meeting Papers 573, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Bah, El-hadj & Fang, Lei, 2016. "Entry Costs, Financial Frictions, And Cross-Country Differences In Income And Tfp," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 884-908, June.
    15. Timothy Kehoe & Felipe Meza, 2011. "Catch-up Growth Followed by Stagnation: Mexico 1950–2008," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 48(2), pages 227-268.
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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Kehoe & Sewon Hur & Kim Ruhl & Jose Asturias, 2016. "Firm Entry and Exit and Aggregate Growth," 2016 Meeting Papers 573, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Cacciatore, Matteo & Duval, Romain & Fiori, Giuseppe & Ghironi, Fabio, 2016. "Market reforms in the time of imbalance," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 69-93.
    3. repec:beh:jbepv1:v:2:y:2018:i:1:p:5-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Kehoe, Timothy J. & Costa, Daniela & Raveendranathan, Gajen, 2016. "The Stages of Economic Growth Revisited, Part 2: Catching Up to and Joining the Economic Leader," Economic Policy Paper 16-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sequencing reforms; Trade barriers; Entry barriers; Contract enforcement;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy

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