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The costs and benefits of liquidity regulations: Lessons from an idle monetary policy tool

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Listed:
  • Christopher Curfman
  • John Kandrac

Abstract

We investigate how liquidity regulations affect banks by examining a dormant monetary policy tool that functions as a liquidity regulation. Our identification strategy uses a regression kink design that relies on the variation in a marginal high-quality liquid asset (HQLA) requirement around an exogenous threshold. We show that mandated increases in HQLA cause banks to reduce credit supply. Liquidity requirements also depress banks' profitability, though some of the regulatory costs are passed on to liability holders. We document a prudential benefit of liquidity requirements by showing that banks subject to a higher requirement before the financial crisis had lower odds of failure.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Curfman & John Kandrac, 2019. "The costs and benefits of liquidity regulations: Lessons from an idle monetary policy tool," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-041, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2019-41
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2019.041
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/feds/files/2019041pap.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Bank Failure; Bank Lending; Liquidity Regulation; Required Reserves;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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