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Inflation dynamics: the role of public debt and policy regimes

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  • Bhattarai, Saroj
  • Lee, Jae Won
  • Park, Woong Yong

Abstract

We investigate the roles of a time-varying inflation target and monetary and fiscal policy stances on the dynamics of inflation in a DSGE model. Under an active monetary and passive fiscal policy regime, inflation closely follows the path of the inflation target and a stronger reaction of monetary policy to inflation decreases the equilibrium response of inflation to non-policy shocks. In sharp contrast, under an active fiscal and passive monetary policy regime, inflation moves in an opposite direction from the inflation target and a stronger reaction of monetary policy to inflation increases the equilibrium response of inflation to non-policy shocks. Moreover, a weaker response of fiscal policy to debt decreases the response of inflation to non-policy shocks. These results are due to variation in the value of public debt that leads to wealth effects on households. Finally, under a passive monetary and passive fiscal policy regime, both monetary and fiscal policy stances affect inflation dynamics, but because of a role for self-fulfilling beliefs due to equilibrium indeterminacy, theory provides no clear answer on the overall behavior of inflation. We characterize these results analytically in a simple model and numerically in a richer quantitative model.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhattarai, Saroj & Lee, Jae Won & Park, Woong Yong, 2012. "Inflation dynamics: the role of public debt and policy regimes," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 124, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:124 Note: Published as: Bhattarai, Saroj, Jae Won Lee and Woong Yong Park (2014), "Inflation Dynamics: The Role of Public Debt and Policy Regimes," Journal of Monetary Economics 67: 93-108.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. By Anna Florio & Alessandro Gobbi, 2015. "Learning the monetary/fiscal interaction under trend inflation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1146-1164.
    2. de Haan, J. & Eijffinger, Sylvester, 2016. "The Politics of Central Bank Independence," Discussion Paper 2016-047, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Gliksberg, Baruch, "undated". "Dynamic Scoring and Monetary Policy," Working Papers WP2014/1, University of Haifa, Department of Economics.
    4. Gliksberg, Baruch, 2016. "Equilibria under monetary and fiscal policy interactions in a portfolio choice model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 209-228.
    5. Anna Florio & Alessandro Gobbi, 2014. "Learning the Fiscal Monetary Interaction under Trend Inflation," DEM Working Papers Series 068, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
    6. repec:eee:eecrev:v:95:y:2017:i:c:p:62-83 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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