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The effect of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being

Author

Listed:
  • Kavetsos, Georgios
  • Kawachi, Ichiro
  • Kyriopoulos, Ilias
  • Vandoros, Sotiris

Abstract

We study the effect of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being in the United Kingdom. Using a quasi-experimental design, we find that this outcome led to an overall decrease in subjective well-being in the UK compared to a control group. The effect is driven by individuals who hold an overall positive attitude towards the EU and shows little signs of adaptation. Subjective well-being of those with a very negative attitude towards the EU increases in the short-run but turns negative, possibly due to unmet expectations. Using three different measures of socio-economic connection between the UK and other European countries, we generally do not find evidence supporting the presence of spillover effects of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being of individuals in other EU countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Kavetsos, Georgios & Kawachi, Ichiro & Kyriopoulos, Ilias & Vandoros, Sotiris, 2018. "The effect of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 91709, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:91709
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    subjective well-being; happiness; Brexit; referendum; election;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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