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Electing Happiness: Does Happiness Effect Voting and do Elections Affect Happiness

  • Nattavudh Powdthavee
  • Paul Dolan, Robert Metcalfe

What causes us to vote and what do we get out of it? We approach these questions using data on voting and subjective well-being (SWB) from a large household panel dataset in the UK. We find some evidence that SWB can affect voting intention but no evidence that the results of three recent elections have any effect on SWB.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of York in its series Discussion Papers with number 08/30.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:08/30
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