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Gender Gap in Performance under Competitive Pressure

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  • Jurajda, Stepan
  • Münich, Daniel

Abstract

Do women perform worse than equally able men in stressful competitive settings? We ask this question for competitions with a high payoff---admissions to tuition-free selective universities. With data on an entire cohort of Czech students graduating from secondary schools and applying to universities, we show that, compared to men of similar general skills and subject-of-study preferences, women do not shy away from applying to more competitive programs and perform similarly well when competition is less intense, but perform substantially worse (are less likely to be admitted) when applying to very selective universities.

Suggested Citation

  • Jurajda, Stepan & Münich, Daniel, 2008. "Gender Gap in Performance under Competitive Pressure," CEPR Discussion Papers 7059, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7059
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Alan Manning & Joanna Swaffield, 2008. "The gender gap in early-career wage growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 983-1024, July.
    4. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Anders Poulsen & Marie Claire Villeval, 2005. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior - Experimental Evidence," Post-Print halshs-00180022, HAL.
    5. Joseph Price, 2008. "Gender Differences in the Response to Competition," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 320-333, April.
    6. Stepan Jurajda & Teodora Paligorova, 2006. "Female Managers and Their Wages in Central Europe," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp296, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    7. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2007. "Do Women Shy Away From Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1067-1101.
    8. Štìpán Jurajda & Michal Franta, 2007. "Occupational Gender Segregation in the Czech Republic (in English)," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 57(5-6), pages 255-271, August.
    9. Randall K. Filer & Daniel Munich, 2000. "Responses of Private and Public Schools to Voucher Funding:The Czech and Hungarian Experience," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp160, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
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    Cited by:

    1. Josse Delfgaauw & Robert Dur & Joeri Sol & Willem Verbeke, 2013. "Tournament Incentives in the Field: Gender Differences in the Workplace," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(2), pages 305-326.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Admissions; Competition; Gender Gap in Performance; Test Anxiety;

    JEL classification:

    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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