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Search Intensity, Cost of Living and Local Labour Markets in Britain

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  • Patacchini, Eleonora
  • Zenou, Yves

Abstract

A model is considered in which optimal search intensity is a result of a trade-off between short-run losses due to higher search costs (more interviews, commuting...) and long-run gains due to a higher chance to find a job. We show that this optimal search intensity is higher in areas characterized by larger cost of living and/or higher labour market tightness. We then test this model using county-level data in England for the period 1991-2000. As predicted by the theoretical model, both the county cost of living and the county labour market tightness are found to have a positive and significant effect on the county search intensity. We also find positive spatial correlation between counties (i.e. clustering of counties with similar level of search intensity) and strong spatial spillover effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2003. "Search Intensity, Cost of Living and Local Labour Markets in Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 3722, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3722
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Gobillon & Harris Selod & Yves Zenou, 2007. "The Mechanisms of Spatial Mismatch," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(12), pages 2401-2427, November.
    2. Sabrina Di Addario, 2005. "Job Search in Thick Markets: Evidence from Italy," Development Working Papers 198, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    3. Moreno-Galbis, E., 2006. "Unemployment and endogenous growth with new technologies-skill complementarity," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 364-386, March.
    4. GOBILLON Laurent & SELOD Harris, 2007. "The effects of segregation and spatial mismatch on unemployment: evidence from France," Research Unit Working Papers 0702, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
    5. E. Moreno-Galbis & Henri Sneessens, 2007. "Low-skilled unemployment, capital-skill complementarity and embodied technical progress," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 73(3), pages 241-272.
    6. Eva, MORENO-GALBIS, 2004. "Unemployment and Endogenous Growth with Capital-Skill Complementarity," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2004001, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    dynamic panel data; GMM estimation; job matching; measurement errors; search intensities; spatial correlation;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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