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Spatial Mismatch in Search Equilibrium

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  • Coulson, N Edward
  • Laing, Derek
  • Wang, Ping

Abstract

We construct a search equilibrium model for a city with central and suburban labor markets that is consistent with the set of empirical regularities commonly associated with the spatial mismatch hypothesis: a higher rate of unemployment for central city residents than suburban residents, a higher job vacancy rate for suburban firms, and reverse commuting and higher suburban wages. The effectiveness and welfare implications of public policy programs that might be used to remedy the underlying mismatch are examined. Copyright 2001 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Coulson, N Edward & Laing, Derek & Wang, Ping, 2001. "Spatial Mismatch in Search Equilibrium," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(4), pages 949-972, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:19:y:2001:i:4:p:949-72
    DOI: 10.1086/322824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zax, Jeffrey S & Kain, John F, 1996. "Moving to the Suburbs: Do Relocating Companies Leave Their Black Employees Behind?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(3), pages 472-504, July.
    2. Keith Ihlanfeldt, 1992. "Job Accessibility and the Employment and School Enrollment of Teenagers," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number jaes, july-dece.
    3. David T. Ellwood, 1986. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Are There Teenage Jobs Missing in the Ghetto?," NBER Chapters, in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 147-190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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