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Multinational Investment, Industry Risk and Policy Competition

Author

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  • Haaland, Jan I.
  • Wooton, Ian

Abstract

In an uncertain business climate, multinational enterprises must take account of future exit costs in deciding where to locate a branch plant. We study how differences in national labour-market conditions between countries influence this decision. Other things equal, the most attractive location has a flexible labour market (low closure costs) together with a low opportunity cost of employment (high unemployment). In a game between two countries, a nation with an inflexible labour market and high unemployment will succeed in attracting low-risk firms, while that with more flexible labour markets and low unemployment will win the game for higher risk firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Haaland, Jan I. & Wooton, Ian, 2002. "Multinational Investment, Industry Risk and Policy Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 3152, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3152
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jan I. Haaland & Ian Wooton & Giulia Faggio, 2002. "Multinational Firms: Easy Come, Easy Go?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 59(1), pages 1-3, February.
    2. Haaland, Jan I & Wooton, Ian, 1999. " International Competition for Multinational Investment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(4), pages 631-649, December.
    3. Markusen, James R. & Venables, Anthony J., 1999. "Foreign direct investment as a catalyst for industrial development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 335-356, February.
    4. Haufler, Andreas & Wooton, Ian, 1999. "Country size and tax competition for foreign direct investment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 121-139, January.
    5. Kind, Hans Jarle & Knarvik, Karen Helene Midelfart & Schjelderup, Guttorm, 2000. "Competing for capital in a 'lumpy' world," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(3), pages 253-274, November.
    6. Devereux, Michael P. & Griffith, Rachel, 1998. "Taxes and the location of production: evidence from a panel of US multinationals," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 335-367, June.
    7. Ram Mudambi, 1999. "Multinational Investment Attraction: Principal-Agent Considerations," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 65-79.
    8. Edward P. Lazear, 1990. "Job Security Provisions and Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 699-726.
    9. Samuel Bentolila & Giuseppe Bertola, 1990. "Firing Costs and Labour Demand: How Bad is Eurosclerosis?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 381-402.
    10. Pissarides, Christopher A., 2001. "Employment protection," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 131-159, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dewit, Gerda & Görg, Holger & Montagna, Catia, 2003. "Should I Stay or Should I Go? A Note on Employment Protection, Domestic Anchorage, and FDI," IZA Discussion Papers 845, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Kerstin Pull, 2003. "Der Einfluss personalpolitischer Flexibilität auf die Standortwahl Multinationaler Unternehmen: eine empirische Analyse," IAAEG Discussion Papers until 2011 200301, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    3. Martin Robson & Roxana Radulescu, 2004. "Does stricter employment protection legislation deter FDI?," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2003 81, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    4. Görg, Holger, 2002. "Fancy a Stay at the 'Hotel California'? Foreign Direct Investment, Taxation and Firing Costs," IZA Discussion Papers 665, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Holger Görg, 2003. "Fancy a stay at the "Hotel California "?Foreign Direct Investment,Taxation and Exit Costs," DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) 96, Netherlands Central Bank.
    6. Asiedu, Elizabeth & Esfahani, Hadi Salehi, 2008. "Is the world flat?: Differential regulation of domestic and foreign-owned firms," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 389-411, May.
    7. Jan I. Haaland & Ian Wooton, 2007. "Domestic Labor Markets and Foreign Direct Investment," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 462-480, August.
    8. Giovanni Immordino, 2003. "Fairness, NGO Activism and the Welfare of Less Developed Countries," CSEF Working Papers 101, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 09 Dec 2007.
    9. Gerda Dewit & Holger Görg & Catia Montagna, 2009. "Should I stay or should I go? Foreign direct investment, employment protection and domestic anchorage," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 145(1), pages 93-110, April.
    10. Christian Bellak & Markus Leibrecht & Jože P. Damijan, 2009. "Infrastructure Endowment and Corporate Income Taxes as Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Central and Eastern European Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 267-290, February.
    11. Holger Görg, 2005. "Fancy a Stay at the 'Hotel California'? The Role of Easy Entry and Exit for FDI," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 519-535, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    entry; exit; investment subsidies; multinational firms; uncertainty;

    JEL classification:

    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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