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Measuring Ethnic Stratification and its Effect on Trust in Africa

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  • Hodler, Roland
  • Srisuma, Sorawoot
  • Vesperoni, Alberto
  • Zurlinden, Noemie

Abstract

We define and axiomatically characterize an index of ethnic stratification that measures the extent to which the hierarchy in socio-economic positions across the individuals of a society follows ethnolinguistic lines. This index generalizes the idea of between-group inequality to situations where data on economic and ethnolinguistic distances between pairs of individuals is available. We define an estimator of our index that takes the form of a second order U-statistic and has well-behaved statistical properties, and we show that ethnic stratification is empirically related to low levels of trust in other people and institutions at the local level in Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Hodler, Roland & Srisuma, Sorawoot & Vesperoni, Alberto & Zurlinden, Noemie, 2018. "Measuring Ethnic Stratification and its Effect on Trust in Africa," CEPR Discussion Papers 13368, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13368
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ethnic diversity; ethnic fractionalization; inequality; Trust;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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